Hopkins Degree Links Public Health and Environmental Engineering


[MUSIC PLAYING] CIARAN HARMAN: At no
other institution will you have this kind
of bridge that links public health, to
environmental engineering, to an understanding of
earth science and climate science, like you can get here. [MUSIC PLAYING] MARSHA WILLS-KARP: In the
Department of Environmental Health and
Engineering, we address the environmental challenges
of the 21st century. KELLOGG J. SCHWAB: What we now
have is emerging contaminants, scarcity of water– so tying this together with
engineering and public health on a water focus will allow
us to explore opportunities for future generations. SPEAKER 1: There’s 148 different
existing food ecolabels. ANDREA FRASER: What it
teaches you is really how to be a researcher,
and to do it in a way that is
getting at the questions that society actually
wants answered. MARSHA WILLS-KARP: In this
newly formulated department, students get the top-notch
environmental engineering training, but they
will also interface with public health and
environmental health faculty. CIARAN HARMAN: They can take
classes in a very flexible way. That means that the
education they get is the education they
need for their goals. KELLOGG J. SCHWAB: The cool
thing about Hopkins’s is anything’s possible. CIARAN HARMAN: We
have research projects all over the world that
you can get involved in. MERRICKA LIVINGSTONE:
The work I’m doing now is primarily in an
animal cancer model. KELLOGG J. SCHWAB: We’ve got a
really exciting project that’s linking family planning and
water and sanitation together. MARSHA WILLS-KARP:
The department is made up of several
unique centers. We have the Center for
Alternatives to Animal Testing. We also have a Center
for a Livable Future. And in the same program, we
have an Aquaponics program, so students in the department
have a wide variety of settings in which to study. [MUSIC PLAYING] CIARAN HARMAN: The proximity
we have to Washington DC means that our research has
a great chance of getting plugged directly into
being actually used. MARSHA WILLS-KARP: This
is a rare opportunity for a student’s work to so
quickly translate into policy. [MUSIC PLAYING] KELLOGG J. SCHWAB:
What’s unique, I think, about our school here– the truly collaborative nature. CIARAN HARMAN: Any undergrad who
walks into my office and says, I want to do research– we
will do a project together. I love that atmosphere here. ANDREA FRASER: This department
is full of unique people. No one is really doing
exactly the same thing. CIARAN HARMAN: They
come in with a sense that they want to save the
world, but they don’t know how. MARSHA WILLS-KARP: The
graduates of our department have a wealth of
employment opportunities. Many have gone
into academia, many go to regulatory agencies
in the government, and others work in
pharmaceutical companies, as well. CIARAN HARMAN: They take away a
deep foundational understanding that means that they can
address the technical challenges of the future, and not just
the ones we know about today. [MUSIC PLAYING]

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